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In A Copy Of Browning In A Copy Of Browning

In A Copy Of Browning
Browning, old fellow,Your leaves grow yellow,Beginning to mellowAs seasons pass.Your cover is wrinkled,And stained and sprinkled,And warped and crinkledFrom sleep on the grass.Is it a wine stain,Or only a pine stain,That makes such a fine stainOn your dull blue,--Got as we numberedThe clouds that lumberedSouthward and slumberedWhen day was through?What is the dear markThere like an earmark,Only a tear markA woman let fall?--As bending overShe bade me discover,"Who _plays_ the lover,He loses all!"With... Poems - Post by : George_Ahrens - Author : Bliss Carman - Read : 1067

Les Miserables - Volume III - BOOK SIXTH - THE CONJUNCTION OF TWO STARS - Chapter I. The Sobriquet; Mode of Formation of Family Names Les Miserables - Volume III - BOOK SIXTH - THE CONJUNCTION OF TWO STARS - Chapter I. The Sobriquet; Mode of Formation of Family Names

Les Miserables - Volume III - BOOK SIXTH - THE CONJUNCTION OF TWO STARS - Chapter I. The Sobriquet; Mode of Formation of Family Names
Marius was, at this epoch, a handsome young man, of medium stature,with thick and intensely black hair, a lofty and intelligent brow,well-opened and passionate nostrils, an air of calmness and sincerity,and with something indescribably proud, thoughtful, and innocentover his whole countenance. His profile, all of whose lineswere rounded, without thereby losing their firmness, had a certainGermanic sweetness, which has made its way into the French physiognomyby way of Alsace and Lorraine, and that... Long Stories - Post by : edbuckson - Author : Victor Hugo - Read : 1306

The Turmoil - Web page 24 The Turmoil - Web page 24

The Turmoil - Web page 24
Sheridan had seized the telephone upon Roscoe's desk, and was callinghis own office, overhead. "Abercrombie? Come down to my son Roscoe'ssuite and get rid of some gentlemen that are waitin' there to see himin room two-fourteen. There's Maples and Schirmer and a couple o'fellows on the Kinsey business. Tell 'em something's come up I haveto go over with Roscoe, and tell 'em to come back day after to-morrowat two. You needn't come in to let me know they're gone; we don'twant to be disturbed. Tell... Long Stories - Post by : sovmark - Author : Booth Tarkington - Read : 2273

The People Of The Mist - Chapter XL - OTTER'S FAREWELL The People Of The Mist - Chapter XL - OTTER'S FAREWELL

The People Of The Mist - Chapter XL - OTTER'S FAREWELL
The night which followed, Leonard is wont to declare, proved to be thevery worst that he ever spent in his life. Notwithstanding his intenseweariness, he could not sleep, his nerves were too shattered to allowof it. Whenever he shut his eyes, he saw himself hanging headdownwards over the oubliette in the cell beneath the idol, or flyingthrough the air across the dreadful gap in the ice-bridge, or in someother position of terror, similar to those with which they had madesuch intimate acquaintance... Long Stories - Post by : Joe_Kumar - Author : H. Rider Haggard - Read : 933

Divorced Divorced

Divorced
Thinking of one thing all day long, at nightI fall asleep, brain weary and heart sore;But only for a little while. At three,Sometimes at two o'clock, I wake and lie,Staring out into darkness; while my thoughtsBegin the weary treadmill-toil again,From that white marriage morning of our youthDown to this dreadful hour. I see your faceLit with the lovelight of the honeymoon;I hear your voice, that lingered on my nameAs if it loved each letter; and I feelThe clinging of your arms about my form,Your... Poems - Post by : cyberbob - Author : Ella Wheeler Wilcox - Read : 844

Rudder Grange - Chapter XV - In which two New Friends disport themselves Rudder Grange - Chapter XV - In which two New Friends disport themselves

Rudder Grange - Chapter XV - In which two New Friends disport themselves
"The nex' mornin' was fine an' nice," continued Pomona, "an' afterour breakfast had been brought to us, we went out in the grounds totake a walk. There was lots of trees back of the house, with walksamong 'em, an' altogether it was so ole-timey an' castleish that Iwas as happy as a lark."'Come along, Earl Miguel,' I says; 'let us tread a measure 'neaththese mantlin' trees.'"'All right,' says he. 'Your Jiguel attends you. An' what mightour noble second name be? What is we earl an' earl-ess of?'"'Oh,... Long Stories - Post by : fxtrader - Author : Frank R Stockton - Read : 891

How The Enemy Came To Thlunrana How The Enemy Came To Thlunrana

How The Enemy Came To Thlunrana
It had been prophesied of old and foreseen from the ancient days that its enemy would come upon Thlunrana. And the date of its doom was known and the gate by which it would enter, yet none had prophesied of the enemy who he was save that he was of the gods though he dwelt with men. Meanwhile Thlunrana, that secret lamaserai, that chief cathedral of wizardry, was the terror of the valley in which it stood and of all lands round about it. So narrow and high were the windows and so strange when lighted... Short Stories - Post by : magichearts - Author : Lord Dunsany - Read : 374

The Little Minister - Chapter XXXVI - Story of the Dominie The Little Minister - Chapter XXXVI - Story of the Dominie

The Little Minister - Chapter XXXVI - Story of the Dominie
When I spoke next, I was back in the school-house, sitting therewith my bonnet on my head, Gavin looking at me. We had forgottenthe cannon at last.In that chair I had anticipated this scene more than once of late.I had seen that a time might come when Gavin would have to be toldall, and I had even said the words aloud, as if he were indeedopposite me. So now I was only repeating the tale, and I couldtell it without emotion, because it was nigh nineteen years old;and I did not look at Gavin, for I... Long Stories - Post by : Worldbridger - Author : James Matthew Barrie - Read : 1945

Oliver Twist - Chapter LIII - AND LAST Oliver Twist - Chapter LIII - AND LAST

Oliver Twist - Chapter LIII - AND LAST
The fortunes of those who have figured in this tale are nearlyclosed. The little that remains to their historian to relate, istold in few and simple words.Before three months had passed, Rose Fleming and Harry Mayliewere married in the village church which was henceforth to be thescene of the young clergyman's labours; on the same day theyentered into possession of their new and happy home.Mrs. Maylie took up her abode with her son and daughter-in-law,to enjoy, during the tranquil remainder of her... Long Stories - Post by : infoseeker - Author : Charles Dickens - Read : 1285

Salthaven - Chapter II Salthaven - Chapter II

Salthaven - Chapter II
MR. ROBERT VYNER entered upon his new duties with enthusiasm. The second day he was at the office half an hour before anybody else; on the third day the staff competed among themselves for the honour of arriving first, and greeted him as respectfully as their feelings would permit when he strolled in at a quarter to eleven. The arrival of the senior partner on the day following at a phenomenally early hour, for the sake of setting an example to the junior, filled them with despair. Their spirits... Long Stories - Post by : jvernon - Author : William Wymark Jacobs - Read : 1064

Revolution And Other Essays - The Dignity of Dollars Revolution And Other Essays - The Dignity of Dollars

Revolution And Other Essays - The Dignity of Dollars
Man is a blind, helpless creature. He looks back with pride upon hisgoodly heritage of the ages, and yet obeys unwittingly every mandateof that heritage; for it is incarnate with him, and in it areembedded the deepest roots of his soul. Strive as he will, he cannotescape it--unless he be a genius, one of those rare creations to whomalone is granted the privilege of doing entirely new and originalthings in entirely new and original ways. But the common clay-bornman, possessing only talents, may... Essays - Post by : Mochri - Author : Jack London - Read : 1484

North Of Boston - A Servant to Servants North Of Boston - A Servant to Servants

North Of Boston - A Servant to Servants
I DIDN'T make you know how glad I was To have you come and camp here on our land. I promised myself to get down some day And see the way you lived, but I don't know! With a houseful of hungry men to feed I guess you'd find.... It seems to me I can't express my feelings any more Than I can raise my voice or want to lift My hand (oh, I can lift it when I have to). Did ever you feel so? I hope you never. It's got so I don't even know for sure Whether I am glad, sorry,... Poems - Post by : REPLYBUSINESS - Author : Robert Frost - Read : 2727

Preachin' On Kingdom-come Preachin' On Kingdom-come

Preachin' On Kingdom-come
I've told ye, stranger, that Hell fer Sartain empties, as it oughter, of co'se, into Kingdom-Come. You can ketch the devil 'most any day in the week on Hell fer Sartain, an' sometimes you can git Glory everlastin' on Kingdom-Come. Hit's the only meetin'-house thar in twenty miles aroun'. Well, the reg'lar rider, ole Jim Skaggs, was dead, an' the bretherin was a-lookin' aroun' fer somebody to step into ole Jim's shoes. Thar'd been one young feller up thar from the settlemints, a-cavortin' aroun',... Short Stories - Post by : syabas - Author : John Fox - Read : 2469

The Best Spare Room The Best Spare Room

The Best Spare Room
I remember, when a youngster, all the happy hours I spentWhen to visit Uncle Hiram in the country oft I went;And the pleasant recollection still in memory has a charmOf my boyish romps and rambles round the dear old-fashioned farm.But at night all joyous fancies from my youthful bosom crept,For I knew they'd surely put me where the "comp'ny" always slept,And my spirit sank within me, as upon it fell the gloomAnd the vast and lonely grandeur of the best spare room.Ah, the weary waste of pillow where... Poems - Post by : Heri_Rosyadi - Author : Joseph Crosby Lincoln - Read : 1772

Roughing It - Chapter 43 Roughing It - Chapter 43

Roughing It - Chapter 43
CHAPTER XLIII. My Friend Boggs--The School Report--Boggs Pays Me An Old Debt--Virginia City However, as I grew better acquainted with the business and learned the run of the sources of information I ceased to require the aid of fancy to any large extent, and became able to fill my columns without diverging noticeably from the domain of fact. I struck up friendships with the reporters of the other journals, and we swapped "regulars" with each other and thus economized work. "Regulars" are permanent... Long Stories - Post by : youkon - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 2276

A Memorable Night A Memorable Night

A Memorable Night
CHAPTER I. I am a young physician of limited practice and great ambition. At the time of the incidents I am about to relate, my office was in a respectable house in Twenty-fourth Street, New York City, and was shared, greatly to my own pleasure and convenience, by a clever young German whose acquaintance I had made in the hospital, and to whom I had become, in the one short year in which we had practised together, most unreasonably attached. I say unreasonably, because it was a liking for which I... Short Stories - Post by : jim_boere - Author : Anna Katharine Green - Read : 2063

The Adventures Of Sally - Chapter VIII - REAPPEARANCE OF MR. CARMYLE--AND GINGER The Adventures Of Sally - Chapter VIII - REAPPEARANCE OF MR. CARMYLE--AND GINGER

The Adventures Of Sally - Chapter VIII - REAPPEARANCE OF MR. CARMYLE--AND GINGER
When Sally left Detroit on the following Saturday, accompanied byFillmore, who was returning to the metropolis for a few days in order tosecure offices and generally make his presence felt along Broadway, herspirits had completely recovered. She felt guiltily that she had beenfanciful, even morbid. Naturally men wanted to get on in the world. Itwas their job. She told herself that she was bound up with Gerald'ssuccess, and that the last thing of which she ought to complain was theenergy he put into... Long Stories - Post by : Moniquej - Author : P G Wodehouse - Read : 1184

Sending To The War Sending To The War

Sending To The War
It was down in our far-off village that we heard of the war begun,But none of the neighbours were in it save the squire's thick-lipped son,A youth and a fool and a captain, who came and went away,And left me glad of his going. There was little for us to sayOf the war and its why and wherefore--and we said it often enough;The papers gave us our wisdom, and we used it up in the rough.But I held my peace and wondered; for I thought of the folly of men,The fair lives ruined and broken that ne'er could... Poems - Post by : jblucas19 - Author : William Morris - Read : 1420

The Privateer The Privateer

The Privateer
Once upon a time there was a wide river that ran into the ocean, and beside it was a little city. And in that city was a wharf where great ships came from far countries. And a narrow road led down a very steep hill to that wharf, and anybody that wanted to go to the wharf had to go down the steep hill on the narrow road, for there wasn't any other way. And because ships had come there for a great many years and all the sailors and all the captains and all the men who had business with the ships had... Short Stories - Post by : jamesc96 - Author : William John Hopkins - Read : 1176

The Two Sides Of The River The Two Sides Of The River

The Two Sides Of The River
_The Youths_.O Winter, O white winter, wert thou goneNo more within the wilds were I aloneLeaping with bent bow over stock and stone!No more alone my love the lamp should burn,Watching the weary spindle twist and turn,Or o'er the web hold back her tears and yearn:O winter, O white winter, wert thou gone!_The Maidens_.Sweet thoughts fly swiftlier than the drifting snow,And with the twisting threads sweet longings grow,And o'er the web sweet pictures come and go,For no white winter are we long alone._The... Poems - Post by : thynke - Author : William Morris - Read : 980